Product Review: 2Gig CT30 ZWave Thermostat

14 Feb

Following below, is pretty much word for word my amazon review of the 2Gig Technologies CT-30 Thermostat with Z-Wave.

This product is actually made by the Radio Thermostat Company of America, and is marketed under several names, such as the one mentioned above, the 3M Filtrete 3m-50 (a Wi-Fi version) and the CT30 by Radio Thermostat, it is also available as part of the Vivint Wireless Alarm System. In any event, it’s the same thermostat and it’s available 3 ways: as a standalone unit, or with different “USNAP” modules, as a Wi-Fi thermostat, and as a Z-Wave thermostat. The latter two options offer some level of remote control of your heating and/or air conditioning system. Depending on how you set it up, this can be within your home or even outside the home on the web or your wireless device. The Wi-Fi version requires a subscription to a service, I believe. (don’t hold me to that)

Overall, it is a nice thermostat. We were working through the kinks and starting to get used to it, but we woke up one day and the heat had not turned up as scheduled. The thermostat would not respond to Z-Wave commands or report back the temperature, so I knew something was up. It took about 2 hours of troubleshooting but I got it working again. Problem is, if it DOES fail when you’re away it won’t continue on its normal schedule, it will just stay at whatever setting it was left on. I don’t think this is the case, but I would be worried that it could get stuck off, which would be trouble in sub-freezing temps.

The thermostat does have a pretty cool looking touchscreen interface, but it projects off the wall a bit, and looks a bulky from the side, and being in the hallway, that’s how it is first seen. If it weren’t for the reliability issues, we’d probably put up with some of the quirks, but we are most likely going to try the Trane TZEMT400 instead, which will run off its own built in schedule if it loses Z-Wave connectivity.

the 2Gig/ Radio Thermostat CT30

My issues with the CT30:

  1. Once connected to Z-Wave, it will not run off the built-in schedule on the unit, you must schedule from Z-Wave.
  2. Unit does not report set-point temp to Z-Wave. ie: If someone changes the temp at the thermostat, the change will not be reflected in Z-Wave, it will only know the last setting that was initiated through Z-Wave. This seems to be a known, designed by choice, issue.
  3. After about a week of seemingly working fine, it began to lose contact with the Z-Wave network, and commands would not be sent to it. I changed the batteries, removed it, and re-added it a few times before it would work normally again. At that point it was not recognized as the same node, so all my scenes in Vera did not refer to it anymore, so I had to redo all the scenes.
  4. From reading the forums, it seems reliability can be spotty due to running off batteries rather than 24V power. Of course, the fact that this unit can run on batteries is one of its main selling points… What I will say about running power to this thing, (or the “C” Wire or “Common” as it’s referred to) is that the C Wire is no more than a ground back at the source of the thermostat wire. This is rarely mentioned in the all the posting about C Wires and transformers, etc., but from what I have learned, that essentially all it is. I do not have a C Wire, but I do have a Common back at the Taco SR502 that my boiler and hot water tank are hooked to, so all I have to do is pull a 3rd wire to my T-Stat and connect to the terminal labeled “COM” in the SR502 and it should work. But if it didn’t have that, I should be able to just run a wire to the metal cabinet of the boiler, furnace, or wherever the T-Stat wire originates from.
  5. I would prefer there to be a plate that mounts to the wall where you wire to and then the unit snaps into the plate. The LuxPro this replaced was like that, and is also “armchair programable” as they say. Also, the battery and wiring access covers are tricky to remove and there is no instruction on how to do so.
  6. Not knowing that the built-in schedule would be useless, I went ahead and programmed the whole thing. This was a tedious process which did not seem to function exactly as the manual says, especially the “Copy” function which did not seem to work at all.
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4 Responses to “Product Review: 2Gig CT30 ZWave Thermostat”

  1. pjbeee August 10, 2012 at 6:34 AM #

    Indeed. Thank you for your review. I am thoroughly surprised (on second thought, why should I be?) that there is so little documentation about programming this device, and why there are so many glitches in its operation. Luckily I did NOT go through the programming process, and have already figured out that the programming on the device itself does NOT work if you’re on Z-Wave. I have the CT30 device on my MIOS desktop (if that’s what that is called), do not see a guide on how to program scenes for this thermostat, and the fan control on the desktop always says “On’ no matter if it’s set to Auto or On (on the CT30 itself it reads fine).

    • Jerry August 11, 2012 at 1:56 PM #

      Thanks for the comment. We don’t have a fan on our system so i can’t comment on that but I do know that the CT-30 does not report its state so anything that is changed at the thermostat will not be reflected on Z wave.
      I suggest you look into the trane if you’re not satisfied. We haven’t had any problems with it, but it does need the “C” wire to work. Look for my post on that of you get to that point.

  2. kelly January 22, 2014 at 4:34 PM #

    I can’t figure out how to open the bottom cover to change the batteries…any help would be great!

    • Jerry January 22, 2014 at 5:22 PM #

      Hi, Kelly
      Thanks for writing… If I recall correctly the main face of the thermostat stays in place while the top and bottom covers come off for battery access, radio module access and mounting. As with most thermostats there is a very real feeling of “I think I’m gonna break this thing” so be careful!
      The installation manual has a good picture that will give you a better idea of how to remove the covers.
      http://www.radiothermostat.com/documents/CT-30-Installation-16apr10.pdf

      Essentially, I think you have to kind of pivot the bottom cover down from the middle, if that makes any sense.

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